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Edition History

Between each edition of the Cleveland map, there are numerous changes to the places that are depicted on the map. There were over 200 changes to places listed on the map between the 4th and 5th editions. For example, restaurants open, close, move, or change names; office buildings change names; new coffeehouses spring up; and airline city ticket offices (as they have nationwide) disappear forever. As such, we will not provide the exhaustive list of such details here. Rather, we present below the more structural changes made between each edition of our Cleveland map, as well as ISBN, release date, and other data.

First Edition

Released: December 22, 1995
Title: Visitor’s Map & Guide to Cleveland
Edition Name: Bicentennial Edition
ISBN/UPC: None/None
Size: 18″ x 24″ (46 x 61 cm)

This edition was the first publication of the map, released on the eve of the city’s bicentennial.

Second Edition

Released: April 8, 1997
Title: Visitor’s Map & Guide to Cleveland
Edition Name: Second Edition
ISBN/UPC: 1889748048/636292312158
Size: 18″ x 24″ (46 x 61 cm)

Changes from the previous edition:

  • RTA transit lines on the main maps are color-coded to match RTA’s colors.
  • RTA walkway between Tower City and Gateway added.
  • Photograph of the city’s skyline added to the cover.
  • Neighborhood names added to the Inset/Transit map.
  • UPC and ISBN bar codes added.
  • General updates to streets and listings to reflect changes in the city between editions, as well as general map improvements. 
  • Significant change of note: the dismantling of the historic Municipal Stadium.

Third Edition

Released: November 9, 1999
Title: Visitor’s Map & Guide to Cleveland
Edition Name: Millennium Edition
ISBN/UPC: 1889748064/636292621793
Size: 18″ x 24″ (46 x 61 cm)

Changes from the previous edition:

  • The addition of cuisine type in italics in the index for each restaurant depicted on the map.
  • General updates to streets and listings to reflect changes in the city between editions, as well as general map improvements. 
  • Significant changes of note: the conversion of the Arcade and the Colonial and Euclid Arcades to hotels; Cleveland Browns Stadium replaces the space of the former Municipal Stadium; new streets in Hough to support new housing construction.

Fourth Edition

Released: September 10, 2004
Title: Cleveland: The Essential Map & Guide
Edition Name: Fourth Edition
ISBN/UPC: 1889748072 (9781889748078)/636292430890
Size: 22½” x 24″ (57 x 61 cm)

Changes from the previous edition:

  • The title of the map was changed from Visitor’s Map & Guide to Cleveland to Cleveland: The Essential Map & Guide to remove the term “Visitor”, as the map was useful to and used by locals as well as visitors to the city.
  • The map sheet size was increased from 18″ x 24″ to 22½” x 24″. (Map scales did not change; the larger size was to accommodate additional data/information.)
  • The neighborhood of Tremont was added.
  • A world time zone map was added to place the city in the global context.
  • Information was added on the Cleveland street address system.
  • The biographical section “About Cleveland” was also presented in French, Italian, Japanese, and Spanish.
  • The category “Airlines” was removed (and the single remaining airline city ticket office [Continental Airlines] was moved to the category “Transportation”.
  • Two new categories were added: Public Art and Coffeehouses.
  • Bridges on the map were more clearly identified as such.
  • Directional arrows were added on one-way streets
  • General improvements were made at Burke Lakefront Airport.
  • The use of codes, such as R1 or H1, to represent a restaurant or a hotel in areas on the map where the name of the establishment would not fit have been removed from all categories on the map to improve readability of the map to be independent of the index. This was accomplished by using arrows to places depicted on the map with text written in nearby open spaces.
  • Category titles in the index itself were color-coded to match the map and map key.
  • The telephone listing on the back cover was divided into eleven categories, including “Cultural Institutions and Venues”, “Cruises and Scenic Rail”, and “Taxis”.
  • General updates to streets and listings to reflect changes in the city between editions, as well as general map improvements. 
  • Significant changes of note: Tower City Amphitheater constructed; Mt. Sinai Hospital closed; increase of activity in Ohio City; demise of the restaurants/nightlife activity in the Flats East Bank underway.

Fifth Edition

Released: February 27, 2008
Title: Cleveland: The Essential Map & Guide
Edition Name: Fifth Edition
ISBN/UPC: 9781889748092/636292818971
Size:
22 -7/16″ x 23-3/8″ (57 x 59 cm)

Changes from the previous edition:

  • The individual buildings of the three major campuses shown on the map were depicted and an unofficial boundary was drawn around each; these campuses are: Cleveland State University, Cleveland Clinic, and Case Western Reserve University (including University Hospitals).
  • A dedicated index for the many buildings of Case Western Reserve University was created in alphabetical order.
  • Italian and Japanese translations of the “About Cleveland” section were removed (because of limited space).
  • Bridge types (e.g., “swing” or “lift”) were added to bridges in the Flats.
  • On the Inset/Transit Map, for the location of rapid transit stations not otherwise clearly known (such as the location of “West Park Station” over “W. 65-Madison” street corners were added; also, station names replaced the codes identifying them on the Waterfront Line.
  • Locations of banks or official bank ATM’s were added.
  • Symbolology was added: used for hospitals, visitor information, airport references, and banks.
  • Fixed base operators were added to Burke Lakefront Airport.
  • Bed & Breakfasts were added and indexed, and so identified under “Hotels/Accommodations”.
  • The category “Coffeehouses” was changed to “Coffee & Tea Houses” to reflect the sprouting of tea houses in the city.
  • Street coverage on the University Circle map was increased slightly to depict the intersection of Cedar and Euclid Hts Blvd. to include the southernmost residential section of the Case Western Reserve University campus.
  • Additional sports facilities were added and indexed (to include, e.g., Krenzler Field, the venue of the city’s soccer team).
  • Additional photos were added to the cover. In addition to the skyline photograph, new images show the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, bridges over and in the Flats, public art and architecture, and a moving rapid transit train under the Terminal Tower.
  • General updates to streets and listings to reflect changes in the city between editions, as well as general map improvements. 
  • Significant changes of note: expansion of the Cleveland Museum of Art and the Cleveland Clinic; substantial proportional increase in the number of coffee/tea houses; development of Tyler Village in St. Clair-Superior; and the name changes of Gund Arena, Jacobs Field, and the CSU Convocation Center to Quicken Loans Arena, Progressive Field, and Wolstein Center respectively.

© 2014 The Cleveland Map Company